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parvati Tag

Kālidāsa and Other Arts From his works, it is clear that Kālidāsa had extensive knowledge of dance, music and painting. His knowledge of dance can be estimated from his play Mālavikāgnimitram. At the very beginning, he makes his famous remark about the stage. नाट्यं भिन्नरुचेर्जनस्य बहुधाप्येकं समाराधनम् | The stage is a one-stop

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Kālidāsa has probably provided us with the finest pictures of the pure life led by sages in hermitages. It is among the many things that he has pioneered. From his description of life in hermitages, it is clear that a sage is one who is more humane than most humans.

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Kumārasambhavam The epic opens with a magnificent hyperbole describing the great Himalayan mountains: स्थितः पृथिव्या इव मानदण्डः || The Himalayas is like a great measuring scale used to measure the earth. The narrative then moves to describing his daughter Pārvatī. We can look at a few descriptions of Pārvatī. प्रभामहत्या शिखयेव दीपस्- त्रिमार्गयेव त्रिदिवस्य मार्गः | संस्कारवत्येव

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There are many works in Sanskrit claiming Kālidāsa to be their author. However, after critical analysis, scholars are unanimous in crediting seven works to Kālidāsa. We can take a brief look at each one of them. 1. Ṛtusaṃhāram This is a small work describing the six seasons – grīṣma (summer), varṣā (monsoon),

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जगतीधरजामाता भवतां भव्याय भूयसे भवतु | कञ्चिदकिञ्चनमपि यद्वीक्षा विदधाति शक्रसमम् || Kāvyakaṇṭha Vāsiṣṭhagaṇapati-muni was an āśukavi and could compose a hundred verses extempore within an hour (The feat is called ‘ghanṭāśataka’). His scholarship, too, was enormous. Once, during an avadhāna in Madras, he composed twenty-five verses in Sanskrit in just six minutes.

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सत्वरकवितासविता कश्चिद्गौडोSहमम्बिकादत्तः | गणपतिरिति कविकुलपतिरितिदक्षो दाक्षिणात्योsहम् || Kāvyakaṇṭha Vāsiṣṭhagaṇapati-muni was good at composing poems even at a very young age. He excelled at composing poetry at an unimaginable pace. In his early years, he travelled to Navadveepa in Bengal to participate in poetry competitions. Navadveepa, which was full of people belonging to

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Dhvani, the power of suggestion, has been held as the most powerful poetic tool by Indian aestheticians. It is the chief instrument through which we achieve impersonality and experience rasa. Appayyadīkṣita, in his work Citramīmāṃsā, cites a single verse that exemplifies dhvani: स्थिताः क्षणं पक्ष्मसु ताडिताधराः पयोधरोत्सेधनिपातचूर्णिताः । वलीषु तस्याः स्खलिताः प्रपेदिरे

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